Medal Cheats

Medal Cheats

Surname: Whitworth
Christian Names: Richard
Country: Australia
State or Province: Queensland
City or Town: Kumbia
Service: Army
Case Notes:

 

Richard Whitworth is known as a purveyor of pickles at a local "country market", and as a doyen of Christianity at his local church. He is also perceived as a damaged Vietnam Veteran, who is unable to acquire recognition or assistance, from the Department of Veterans Affairs (DVA), because of the secret nature of his military service.

Whitworth 1

Whitwhorth also marches on commemorative occasions with his "military mates" to give proof of his military heritage.

 

Whitworth 2

Whitworth, as a devoted Christian, often preaches sermons at his local church. As well as slipping stories of his Vietnam escapades into casual conversations, he has also preached a sermon on the subject.

The sermon was recorded, and we hold a copy. It was published here www.kingaroysdachurch.org.au/site/index.php/sermons/2-features in 2016, twelve sermons from the bottom. It runs for 28 minutes and 19 seconds, although by now, perhaps the embarrassed congregation has had it removed?

Whitworth 3


Here are examples of what he said in the sermon.

He was a National Serviceman during the Vietnam war.
Served in Vietnam from 1965 until 1968.
Served with D Company 6 Royal Australian Regiment at the battle of Long Tan Vietnam
He served with Special Air Service Regiment (SASR) in Vietnam.
He and four other SASR soldiers, whilst on patrol, came in contact with the Viet Cong .
Three of the team were killed.
One had his leg blown off.
Whitworth was wounded in the head and still has scars.
He was captured, and "patched up" in a Viet Kong tunnel.
Was kept as a prisoner in a cell of 1.5 cu meters.
After twelve months in captivity, he was rescued by a friendly helicopter.
Forty two years later he was severely affected by Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, and manages daily life through god and work.
Suffers from survivors guilt.

On other occasions, he has said he is unable to apply for recognition or assistance, from the Department of Veterans Affairs, because of the secret nature of his service. Any person who served in Vietnam, can easily discern Whitworth, as flagrant liar, who audaciously lies without trepidation, in a manner, and in a place, where his actions, are disgusting to church attendees and Australian and New Zealand veterans.

What Whitworth has said about his Vietnam service, are fanciful despicable lies. He is not listed on the Department of Veterans affair (DVA) Vietnam Nominal Roll because he did not serve in Vietnam.

He, was much respected in his community, however, it is now known, that he is nothing more than a liar, who has the audacity to enhance his standing in his community, by stealing the valour of returned veterans.

Usually lies about false service are told in pubs and clubs, it is unusual for a community doyen, to tell bald face lies, to those who trust him, both in and out of church.

Whitworth has broken the 11th and 12th Commandments, which are:

"11th, do not covert thy neighbours military service"
 
"12th, thou shall not get caught"
 
"If you do, ANZMI angels will swoop down, and spread the word of your sins to the whole world"


Perhaps the country folk of Kumbia may forgive Whitworth, as good Christians have a want to do, however, veterans of Australia and New Zealand will not forgive, or forget, hence he will remain in ANZMI custody for eternity, plus ten years.

Lest we forget.

Surname: STEVENS
Christian Names: Edwin
Country: Australia
State or Province: Western Australia
City or Town: Perth
Service: Army
Case Notes:

 

Liars and valour thieves clog up our veterans compensation channels, more so during the 1980s to early 2000s, when disgraceful people were causing embarrassment to Department of Veterans Affairs (DVA), with their own, and others false claims. Here are some who were involved:

"China" Hammel. www.anzmi.net/~anzminet/index.php/cheats...r-thieves/218-hammal
Harry Kirkman. anzmi.net/index.php/cheats-thieves/valour-thieves/228-kirkman
Barry Wright. anzmi.net/index.php/cheats-thieves/valour-thieves/258-wright
Joseph Brain. mail.anzmi.net/index.php/cheats-thieves/...ur-thieves/277-brain


The latest valour thief, menace and DVA "clogger" is Edwin Stevens of Perth WA. Since 2007 Stevens has been "trying it on", with DVA, Department of Defence (DoD), and the Special Air Service Regiment (SASR).

Unfortunately we have no photograph of Stevens, perhaps we may get lucky and receive one from him, or an interested party.

The crux of the matter, is that Stevens is seeking a pension for Post Traumatic Stress disorder, that he claims was caused by service in the Vietnam war in 1970, on a secret "black ops" quick deployment to Laos.

The exposure is long in detail, but it is necessary to provide a full picture of Stevens’ deceit and his motives to defraud the Department of Veterans Affairs by illegal means.

All is detailed in an Administrative Appeals Tribunal dated 21 December 2020. To wit:

"1 Mr Stevens enlisted with the Australian Army in 1969 when he was 18 years of age. He was posted to the Special Air Service Regiment in November of that year, where he served until his discharge in April 1970.

5. Mr Stevens has tried to obtain confirmation of his involvement in the covert operation, but no record of his involvement could be located. Specifically, Mr Stevens sent a letter to the Australian Army which was received on 18 May 2004. However, when the Australian Army wrote back to him on 29 July 2004 the letter stated that, “I regret to advise that a thorough search of this office has failed to locate any documents which substantiate the events referred to in your enquiry”.

9. Mr Stevens has provided detailed statements to the Respondent and to the Tribunal describing the covert operation. In summary, he stated that he was deployed to Laos to assist in bombing a bridge that was close to the Vietnamese border and that he was instructed to kill the sentry (soldier guarding the bridge) with a knife while his partner set explosive charges under the bridge. In one statement dated 9 July 2019, Mr Stevens attested:

I was serving as a Trooper In the Special Air Service Regiment of the Australian Regular Army posted to the regiment's Base Squadron during the first days of February 1970. I was summoned to the Regimental Major's office where he was in company with my Squadron C. O., Major, W. Marshall and Lieutenant J. Flannery. I was ordered that in company with another Trooper I would travel to a section in Laos, a country under United Nations military sanctions and assist in the destruction of a bridge that Intelligence had identified that the North Vietnamese Army and Viet Cong were using to ferry soldiers, armoury, ammunition and supplies into Vietnam. I was informed that I had been recommended for this mission by Lt. Flannery who had been the C.O. of my Cadre Course and was later my C.O. when I assisted with new cadre courses during training. I asked why 3 Squadron that was currently in Vietnam couldn't do this job and was told that it was otherwise occupied therefore I was ordered to undertake this mission. I objected, pointing out that I was awaiting release from the Army, but was told that while I was in the Army I would do as ordered. I was also given the order that I was not to discuss this job with any Trooper in the Regiment or anybody else prior to the mission or after as it was not going to be officially recorded.

The intelligence gathered reported that after daylight hours there was only one sentry on the bridge and that the early hours in the morning was the best time to complete the mission. My task was to silence any bridge-sentry and search for any log books or other documentation if any. Lt. Flannery knew my night and map-reading skills were good and told me that was why I was selected to go. He, as a former Vietnam Trainer, taught me how to use a blade to silence the sentry as my partner, Jeff, was to set charges on the bridge then blow it up. Our Liaison Officer in Vietnam was a Lieutenant from 3 Squadron.

The Liaison Officer met us at Nui Dat at the start of the second week when we landed after one stop that, I presumed, was for refuelling. He issued the explosives and charges to my partner. I was given the radio, our frequency and call-sign and the Liaison Officer's call-sign. We were then driven to where a helicopter was waiting which we both boarded. There were two pilots and two gunners situated on each side of the helicopter. Once at the drop-zone we left the chopper as the vegetation was low and made it possible. We both lay on the ground after the chopper left just to ensure we were alone. We were approximately ten miles from the bridge at that time and the vegetation gave us adequate cover. The terrain was not steep so we were able to move slowly but easily. After approximately three hours we got to within 100 yards of the bridge where we set up our position under the vegetation. We lay head to toe so we had a full 360-degree vision but I was also responsible for counting the number of enemy vehicles over and back, the number of soldiers, armoury and ammunition trucks. We lay watching and recording every vehicle that went across that bridge. At night we took two-hourly breaks each to sleep and eat as during daylight hours neither of us ate or slept.

Whenever a truck full of soldiers (a platoon – 30 men) arrived at the Laos side the soldiers disembarked and once the truck was safely over to the Vietnam side of Laos the men walked across, remounted the truck and then drove off. Any truck with ammunition and a towed artillery piece behind it was guided by the bridge-sentry as the truck moved over slowly. It was obvious that this bridge was not too secure as the intelligence photos showed. In all I counted 23 trucks, approximately 400 soldiers in 13 of the trucks. There were more in the trucks that carried arms, ammunition and artillery pieces and they also dismounted leaving only the driver and remounted on the other side. I do not remember how many artillery pieces crossed that bridge as I did not keep my note pad; there were 5 to 7 from memory. Ten to twelve vehicles returned empty and went over to the Laos side. I have no idea if they returned.

On the 4th night we went to the bridge, approximately between 03.00 hours and 03.30 hours, I went to the sentry's hut and did what I was taught to do [killed the sentry with a knife]. There was no records or log-books in the hut so I searched the dead sentry. He had nothing except a packet of cigarettes, matches and a photograph of him and his wife holding their baby. I returned it to his left breast-pocket. I gave my mate a flicker of my lighter so he knew it was all clear for him to do his job. By the time I got to him he had the whole bridge set to go. Once a safe distance away he blew up the bridge and we grabbed the rest of our gear and ran, stopping every 100 yards or so to listen if the enemy was behind us and following. They were not, so we slowed to a fast walk for about a mile listening as we moved through the vegetation as we first went in - patrolling. Thankfully the vegetation in the area gave us adequate cover which made the going easier than we had anticipated. By approximately 05.00 hours we arrived back at our drop-zone ready for pick up. I called our Liaison Officer who told me we had to wait until he could get the chopper to our position for pickup. It took about two hours but when it came we mounted it and returned to Nui Dat where again, the Lieutenant was waiting in a jeep. He took our note-books and after debriefing us where we stood, he told us that they had intelligence that the NVA and VC were getting ready for a big advance on our troops so what we did may have saved some of our Diggers' lives. We were then driven to what was referred to as SAS Hill, showered, changed to clean jungle greens and socks and then fed. We returned to Campbell Barracks six days after we left where we were debriefed again by Lt. Flannery.

I spoke to my Sergeant, Ian Ramsey, about it. He informed me that being so close to Joe Flannery and seeing part of my training he knew everything I did and after we discussed it I told him that I was angry that I was ordered to do what I did and he told me, that’s the job, we all do it so suck it up and get on with it. Until my final discharge I again assisted on Cadre Courses and regimental duties."

Because I was ordered never to divulge anything to do with that job to anyone I took that order to be in force even after my discharge. I was extremely angry at what I was ordered to do with a minimum of training or preparation".

Having read all of that, here is the reason the AAT upheld the decision of the Veterans Review Board that originally rejected Steven's claims.

The effect of these provisions of the VEA is that, as there is no evidence that Mr Stevens was allotted for duty in an operational area and, he does not meet the definition of having rendered eligible war service. This in turn means that Mr Stevens’ posttraumatic stress disorder cannot be taken to be war-caused because there is no evidence that it arose out of, or was attributable to, any eligible war service that he rendered. This means that he is not eligible for a Pension.

To translate the above into veterans language. Stevens is a bullshit artist and a pathological liar.

Instances like this should be prosecuted under the Australian Defence Act 1903 Part VII Section 80A for falsely representing to be a returned soldier. That offence has a maximum penalty of $3,300 or six months imprisonment, or both.

Perhaps a few prosecutions by state police, may discourage the fraudsters, and allow those genuinely in need to get a fair go.

We are not sure what the penalty may be, for falsely claiming to blow up a bridge in Laos. The Laotians may wish to sue Stevens for wilful destruction of the bridge and murder of the guard.

We are happy to report Stevens, but because of his knife work, he is not welcome within ten kilometers of ANZMI.

Surname: Carter
Christian Names: Leonard William (Len)
Country: Australia
State or Province: New South Wales
City or Town: Menai
Case Notes:

 

UPDATE Len Carter December 2020

Len Carter is a Fireman, who needs to hose down his penchant for wearing a uniform and fake medals.

Since being reported in Jul 20, he has been seen strutting resplendent, in his Fire Brigade Group Captains' uniform, which is still decked out with the same dross that was previously reported.

This photograph was taken on the occasion of Menai Rural Fire Station's 80th Anniversary, on Sunday 22nd November 2020, which is four months after our original report.

Carter L2021


We advise Carter, that fake medals do not maketh the man, and those he has mesmerised with his bling, will now laugh at his "stretch" for false fame.

The Oxford dictionary now includes the term "Dickhead" and it means "A stupid, irritating, or ridiculous man" This aptly describes a person who continues to wear inappropriate medals, after it has been pointed out to him, that his actions are ludicrous.

A reasonable person would assume, that the New South Wales Rural Fire Service, would take action against Leonard Carter, however perhaps they are afraid of the power exhibited by Carter's uniform and "medals".

*****

 

“Give a man a uniform and you will see his true character.”
                                                                                          (Anon)


Case notes:

Medal Cheats and Wannabes are fairly easy to detect. They are easily identifiable by their peers, particularly in the Military because the Wannabe is usually the loud mouth, know it all who wears honours and awards they are not entitled to and attempt to create a persona they have no right to claim. Our website is full of these characters.

While ANZMI tend to only investigate ‘military imposters’, every now and then a case comes along involving someone in the Emergency Services whose stupidity and arrogance is such that we could not refuse to investigate the case.

This the story of Len Carter, AFSM a senior member of the NSW Rural Fire Service who has come to our attention by wearing a plethora of fake ‘tin’ medals and worse, a specialist badge only able to be worn by uniformed members of the United States Armed Forces.

Here are a selection of images of Mr Len Carter, AFSM (as he likes to be called):



The problem that confronted our researcher who was looking into the case was the fact that every photo has him wearing a different medal rack so identifying the ‘tin’ has not been easy, but we were able to pin most of them down.

It is probably easier to start with the medals we believe he is entitled to wear.

Left Breast
Australian Fire Service Medal (AFSM)
National Medal

Right Breast
NSW Rural Fire Service Medal (plus clasps for years of service)
NSW Rural Fire Service Commendation for Service
Year of the Volunteer Medal

And now to the rest…On the left breast, Carter displays the following:



Left Breast
QE2 Dimond Jubilee Medal (NO Entitlement) – not accepted for general wear by the Australian Government
QE2 Golden Jubilee Medal (NO Entitlement)
Foreign Service Medal (Tin)
AFSM (Entitled see above)
National Medal (Entitled see above)
National Defence Medal (Tin)
Cadet Forces Medal (Tin)

Right Breast:
NSW Rural Fire Service Medal (plus clasps for years of service)
Unknown (Tin)
Year of the Volunteer Medal
NSW Rural Fire Service Commendation for Service
Unknown (Tin)
Unknown (Tin)


In one of the images, Carter is seen wearing an unknown neck decoration, we have tried to identify it and there are a number of possibilities including the Maltese Cross of Order of St John , a popular choice among Wannabes already on our website.

'Tin' is the generic term we at ANZMI use to describe any unofficial commemorative medal that can be purchased rather than issued by the Federal or State Government, recognised philanthropic organisation or Foreign Government (and approved for wear by the Governor General of Australia). There are a number of organisations that 'create' a commemorative medal specific to the needs of that organisation but they are NOT official medals and should never be mixed with Officially sanctioned and properly issued medals.

Examples of the ‘Tin’ being worn by Carter are seen above. These type of ‘medals’ are becoming harder to find in Australia, but they are still very much in circulation overseas. While the above are predominately designed to align with service in a Defence Force, however further research indicates they could ‘loosely’ be linked to Emergency Services as well.

For example, the ‘award criteria’ for the Foreign Service Medal states:



Note the line The Medal is to commemorate overseas service in both War and Peace, that has not been recognised by any award’. We know that Carter has traveled extensively overseas attending numerous firefighting related events, but we don’t believe that constitutes foreign service in any shape or form. In any event, as a representative of the NSW Rural Fire Service, he has already been awarded the National Medal, NSW RFS Medal and not to mention the Australian Fire Service Medal (AFSM).

In truth, the only real criteria for the award of these ‘medals’ is to have a valid credit card or PayPal account.

In some of the images, Carter can be seen wearing two of the medals awarded to recognise the Golden and Diamond Jubilees of Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth II. Both are genuine medals but neither medal is approved for wear by Australians, except for a small select number approved by the Governor General. When approved for issued by The Queen, the medals were awarded across the Commonwealth to the Defence Forces, Emergency Service personnel and numerous others. However, Australian governments at the time decided not to accept the awards, other than for a select group of citizens.

The select few who are authorised include winners of the Victoria Cross, George Cross, Cross of Valour (Australia) and State Governors. Mr Len Carter, AFSM does not qualify and should not be wearing these ribbons/medals.



Len Carter, AFSM does not limit his wearing of illegal medals to his RFS duties, he is also a member of the local Light Horse
Re-enactment Group. Not surprisingly, he has a different rack for this role. We wonder how he keeps up with what medals to wear when and why.



Now to the matter of improper use of Military Badges.

On the left breast, above the medal racks, Carter can be seen wearing the prestigious Master Explosive Ordnance Disposal Badge. He has absolutely no entitlement to this award.

 



There can be no reason or excuse to explain why Carter has decided to wear this badge on his RFS uniform, other than to portray the image of a person highly trained in explosive ordnance disposal (EOD). As may current and former service personnel know, EOD work is one of the most highly dangerous roles that can be undertaken, and EOD operators make up a high percentage of modern day battle casualties.

For Carter, for whatever reason, to wear this badge is offensive to the veteran community. Notwithstanding the fact he has no military service that we can find, the Master EOD Badge he wears can only be awarded to qualified members of the United States Armed Forces only.

Yes, Carter is a wannabe and the fact that he wears medals, badges and bling that is either not authorised or simply tin rubbish is bad enough but the fact that he does so while wearing the uniform of the NSW Rural Fire Service is of serious concern to ANZMI and should concern the Commissioner of the NSW RFS.

The NSW RFS is made up of volunteers who desire to protect their communities from the threats of bush fire and natural disaster. Many volunteers are young and impressionable men and women who would generally expect that a senior officer of the RFS wearing a chest full of medals and badges has the ‘runs on the board’ so to speak to justify the wearing of those awards.

Carter is not that sort of leader. He has chosen to embellish his uniform with tin rubbish and stolen the valour of the United Stated Armed Forces EOD personnel.

Cater was awarded the Australian Fire Service Medal (AFSM), a prestigious medal of no small significance in 2004. He should be satisfied that by granting him that award, his country is acknowledging his service with the RFS. If he thinks so little of that award that he chooses to mix it in with cheap, fake medals then he should return the AFSM immediately. Better still, perhaps the RFS could move to have the AFSM taken from Cater because of his offensive and illegal behaviour.

It is fortuitous for Carter that he is unlikely to be prosecuted for his actions. The Defence Act 1903 does have provision to prosecute for the improper use of service badges, but as the EOD badge is an American award, it is unlikely that a successful prosecution could be achieved.

Carter will have to be judged in the Court of Public Opinion by his peers and those who read this report. If one of those who read this is the Commissioner of the NSW RFS, perhaps he could take the appropriate action to ensure that the RFS uniform is not belittled by persons wearing unauthorised badges and bling and take action to remove Len Cater, AFSM from positions of responsibility in the Rural Fire Service.

Surname: Bateman
Christian Names: Toby
Country: Australia
State or Province: New South Wales
City or Town: Shoalhaven
Service: Claims Navy Reserve, USA Navy and Army
Branch: Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD)
Commencement of service: Claims 1972
Completion of service: Claims 1980
Case Notes:

 

We know this man resides in the Shoalhaven/Nowra region of New South Wales, however despite many hours of research we have been unable to track him down.

We ask our readers, particularly those from Shoalhaven/Nowra, if they are able to identify a man named, Toby Bateman. Bateman is a particularly skilled deceiver. however, like all liars, he makes mistakes in the detail.

All of his offending has been on social media.

Toby Bateman has ridiculed and threatened, those who question his Vietnam Service. He threatened two people, who questioned his service, on social media:

Bateman T1


Over many years we have learned that wannabes first defence, is to threaten those who expose them. Genuine veteran may get a bit "stroppy" but are always proud to provide their bona fides. It is so easy to simply provide evidence of service.

Bateman claims to have transferred from Royal Australian Navy Reserve, to full time service with the United States Navy, in 1972. He has said a lot about his "service", and is knowledgeable, but makes many mistakes in the detail. Here is his "service" as advertised on social media:

Bateman T2


Claims to have served at Fort Bragg in USA, but wrongly spells "Bragg" with only one "g". It is correctly spelled Fort Bragg. Named after General Braxton Bragg.

He is also a Motor Bike enthusiast. and wrote the following about a motor bike track.

Bateman T9


Notice the motif in the top left corner, is the same as those relating to his US Navy service. Anyone who knows the identity of this person should please contact us

What do we know about Bateman?:

He was born in Sydney in 1953, making him now 67 years of age.
Now resides in Nowra/Shoalhaven area of NSW.
He is a motorbike enthusiast, associated with "Triumph" motorbikes. He is Regional Representative for a Triumph Motor bike club as shown below.

Bateman T10
Bateman T3


He claims to be both ex Australian Navy Reservist and a USA Navy, Vietnam veteran.
Claims to have served in Da Nang Vietnam in 1975. Spells Da Nang as "Dar Nang"
Here is the official history of US Navy presence in Da Nang Vietnam. All departed by 1973.

Camp Tien Sha, a.k.a. Naval Support Activity Da Nang was established in 1964 and disestablished in April 1972. On 29 March 1973 the last American units left Da Nang. On 25 Aug 14973, the USA Congress passed the "Case Church Amendment" which forbade any further USA Military involvement in Vietnam.

Claims to have Joined RAN (R) in 1972 aged 19 years. National Australian Archives have no record of him ever serving.

He claims he was presented with the USA medals shown below for his Vietnam and USA Navy service.

Bateman T4


First row:
Claims these USA medals for his Vietnam service, they are out of precedence order.

Bronze Star Medal.
Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal.
Vietnam Service Medal.
National Defence Service Medal.

Second row
Bronze Star Ribbon.
Fleet Marine Force Ribbon (can't be positive of the colour).
Vietnam Service Medal.
Vietnam Gallantry Cross Unit Citation with Palm.

The third row.
Vietnam Gallantry Cross Unit Citation with Palm.

The fourth row.
National Defense Service Medal.
Combat Action Ribbon (it is upside down).
Navy & Marine Corps Overseas Service Ribbon.

Claims his USN Vietnam service was acknowledged by Australian Honours and Awards and was awarded an Australian Active service Medal (AASM) and an Australian Service Medal (ASM). This did not occur.

Bateman T5


Has photographs from a helicopter of his service in Vietnam in 1975. Photograph was proven to have been taken by, and belonging to, a person from Kansas USA who knows nothing of Bateman being in that helicopter, and advises that the photograph was not taken in 1975

Bateman T6


Claims there were still Australian troops in Vietnam in 1975. See details in above insert.

Claims Australian troops departed Vietnam by chartered QANTAS flight on 25 April 1975. In fact the last QANTAS charter to carry Australian troops, was in 1972. QANTAS had "Baby rescue flights from Saigon in 1975, but no Troops were aboard

Bateman T7


Claims his US Navy unit was USN 5 Platoon Air Mobile Combat Ordnance disposal, which is incorrect. For example US Navy, uses the term "EOD Mobile Unit Eleven" . EOD Stands for "Explosive Ordnance Disposal.

Bateman T8


Like the "Scarlet Pimpernel" Toby Bateman is hard to pin down, however, we now hope that with your help, we may be able to receive a photograph of him, and also ask him directectly about his US Navy service in Vietnam.

It would be a great pleasure to receive from him definitive proof of his service.

Initially, Bateman was communicating with returned veterans on a social media website, and those returned veterans, like us, know full well that Bateman is a liar and a wannabe.

At the moment, Bateman is in the ANZMI remand section, and when information is received, we look forward to promoting him to full time service with ANZMI.

Surname: Hutchinson
Christian Names: Arthur
Country: Australia
State or Province: Western Australia
City or Town: Albany
Service: Army
Case Notes:

 

Arthur Hutchinson has served in Australian Defence Force (ADF), and for that, wears two medals for domestic service on his left breast, together with the Federal National medal, and a WA State medal, which is not authorised to be worn on the left breast, with Defence or Federal medals.

Hutchinson1


The medals he wears are:

Reserve Force Medal
National Medal
Australian Defence Medal
WA State Emergency Service ten year medal with clasp. Must be worn on right breast

Here is the offending medal

Hutchinson2 Hutchinson2a Hutchinson2b 

 
The WA Returned and Services League (RSL) official policy is show below:
 

"THE RETURNED & SERVICES LEAGUE OF AUSTRALIA WA BRANCH INCORPORATED (RSLWA) MEDALS AND DRESS POLICY
UNOFFICIAL MEDALS

19.The wearing of unofficial medals mixed with Decorations, Campaign Stars/Medals, War and Service Medals is not approved. Over a number of years some ex-service organisations have created and distributed ‘commemorative’ medals to mark particular periods of military service. These medals have no official status. 20.Only those medals, decorations and honours which have been created under the prerogative of the Crown, have official status. Such medals and decorations must be worn in accordance with The Order of Wearing Australian Honours and Awards on the left breast either on an official uniform or civilian dress."

The term "created under the prerogative of the Crown" means, medals must be approved by the Governor General of Australia. These rules were created under the Australian Constitution, at the time of Federation in 1901, and have never been altered. Western Australian bureaucrats, and politicians may award WA State medals, but must not instruct recipients to attach them to Federal racks worn on the left breast.

There is an ever increasing trend to mix non Federal medals with Defence and Federal medals. We have published an instance of a veteran wearing a Boy Scout medal with New Zealand Defence medals. anzmi.net/index.php/cheats-thieves/medal-pin-cheats/779-wardlaw . Veterans, and others interested in this matter, could actively advise those who do not follow the rules, and if necessary we will list those who offend

We welcome Western Australian SES senior member, Arthur Hutchinson aboard ANZMI, where, if he earns any ANZMI decorations they must be worn on the right breast.

Surname: .
Christian Names: .
Country: Australia
State or Province: New South Wales
City or Town: Maitland
Case Notes:

 

The Maitland Returned and Services League (RSL) Sub Branch, is led by a duo of remiss medals wearers. The Maitland East RSL has one careless medals wearer. Here are the three:

No 1. Eric BELL - The RSL President Maitland.
No2. Henry MESKAUSIAS - The RSL Treasurer Maitland.
No3. Peter BLACKMORE OAM - RSL active member East Maitland.

Here is Eric Bell:

Bell E1


Bell is wearing:

A National Medal - For Police Service
Australian Defence Medal - Army National Service
Anniversary of National Service Medal - Army National Service
NSW Police Force ‘Diligent and Ethical Service - State Police medal, not to be worn on left breast.

Here is the offending medal worn by Bell.

Bell E2

 


Here is Henry Meskausias 

Meskausias 1

Meskausias is wearing

Australian Sports Medal - For service to Sport
Australian Defence Medal - Army National Service
Anniversary of National Service - Army National Service
NSW Local Government Outstanding Service. - Local Government medal. Not to be worn on left breast.

Here is Blackmore.

Blackmore1

Blackmore is wearing.

Order of Australia Medal - For service to local government, and to the community of Maitland.
Australian Defence Medal - Army National Service.
Anniversary of National Service Medal - Army National Service.
NSW Local Government Outstanding Service - Local Government medal. Not to be worn on left breast.

Shown on the right hand side of the rack below is the offending medal, worn by both Meskausias and Blackmore.

Blackmore2

Of the twelve medals worn by the three Maitland area RSL members, nine are for domestic service in Australia. Two of the medals worn are Local Government awards. One is a State Government Police award. None of these three medals are approved to be worn on the left breast, by the office of the Governor General of Australia, or the NSW State RSL.

We suggest to members of the two Maitland RSLs, particularly those wearing hard won medals celebrating overseas service, lodge complaints, regarding the current careless disregard of medals protocol by senior RSL members. In addition, RSL NSW has been advised, and we look forward to individual counseling of the offenders, and the transfer of the offending medals, from the left breast across to the right breast.

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