MAY

Date of Entry: 19/02/2021
Surname: May
Christian Names: Alison
Country: Australia
State or Province: South Australia
City or Town: Kingswood
Service: NIL
Case Notes:

 

When you are employed as a civilian by the Australian Government in the Defence Department, wearing an un-awarded military medal on ANZAC day is going to attract a great deal of attention. In particular, from Australian Defence Force personnel, (ADF) who have actually been deployed on active service duty in various theatres of war.

ADF personnel have been there and they have done the hard yards. They find it hard to condone medal cheats who wear medals on important ceremonial occasions that have not been earned. In this particular case, ANZAC Day.

Alison May is currently employed with the Department of Defence. ANZMI will not disclose where she currently works or what position she holds.

ANZMI will disclose though, that in her current senior position, she should have more sense.

Alison May is a medal cheat. It is as simple as that. She has never been a sworn member of the Australian Defence Force, Army, Navy or Air Force.

 

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In the above photographs, at a recent ANZAC Day ceremony, May is wearing the following -;

1. The Australian Operational Service Medal - Civilian. (OSM) Possibly entitled.

2. The Timor Leste Solidarity Medal. (TLSM) Not entitled..

Above the medals she wears a CDF Defence Force Commendation badge. Entitlement unknown. Below the medals she wears an Australian Operational Service badge.

MayAlison1B

The Operational Service Medal-Civilian is awarded to civilian persons who meet the criteria of serving 30 days continuous or accrued days in East Timor between the dates stipulated. ANZMI has been informed that May served as a civilian in East Timor in 2009 and is possibly entitled to this award.

The Timor Leste Solidarity medal (below) is a foreign award proclaimed by the East Timor Government. It is only awarded to members of the Australian Defence Force and other eligible foreign Defence Force personnel, who have completed a continuous or accrued period of 180 days. This does not include civilians. Alison May’s name does not appear on the List of Recipients for this award and she is not entitled to wear it.

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The criteria for the medal are indicated below.

Criteria
Personnel may be awarded the medal if they meet personnel and time qualifications. Personnel eligible are military or police personnel who have served on a mandated mission assisting with peace and stability operations. Military or Police personnel may also be eligible if they were posted to a recognised bilateral support mission to East Timor.

Personnel must have served a minimum of 180 continuous or accrued days of service in East Timor from 1 May 2006. Personnel may also be nominated who served a minimum of 120 days from 1 May 2006, or who served with a start date in May or June 2006 for a period at least 90 days. The President of East Timor may also consider extraordinary circumstances for those who are outside of mandated time periods. Applications for extraordinary cases are approved and submitted through national missions to be considered and approved by the president. Notification of approved cases will be returned in writing.

May was contacted and invited to respond to information received from concerned veterans that she was wearing an un-awarded Timor Leste Solidarity medal.

Her response was -;

Hi
I have a Timor Leste OSM which was given to me by an ex-partner who had PTSD and said he didn’t want it any more. I told him to keep it, but when he was going to throw it in the bin I agreed to put it in the cupboard. I have no recollection of ever wearing it because it is associated with an unpleasant and destructive relationship. If at some point I did, I can only guess that it was absent minded when grabbing my other medals and pins which I keep all together. There could have been one ANZAC Day in 2014 or 2015 where I wore it with the intention of representing him, because I recall him being in the psych ward at the Repatriation hospital and visiting him after the morning service. However, I am only guessing as I obviously had a lot of other things on my mind at that time.

I request copies of whatever photo prompted your query.

You or any other appropriate agency is welcome to the medal as it holds no value to me.

The interesting part of this response is that Defence Force personnel have to apply in writing to have the Timor Leste Solidarity Medal awarded to them. It is incongruous that someone would apply for the medal, have the application accepted, be awarded the medal, and then want to throw the medal in the bin, as claimed by Alison May.

That part of May’s response does not make sense. In fairness, May requested and was then forwarded a photograph of herself wearing the medals (above). She was invited to make further comment about her entitlement to the Timor Leste Medal, the OSM and the badges that appear both above and below the medals. She responded -;

As I previously said, the Solidarity medal belonged to an ex-partner of mine –(Name deleted by ANZMI). You will find that he is standing next to me in the original versions of the photos. I recall on one ANZAC day him asking me to wear it, but did not recall whether I agreed to his request. He was (and probably still is) an extremely unstable and chaotic person, with severe addiction issues so I generally agreed to whatever would keep him calm.

It was 5-6 years ago, but I seem to remember him mentioning something about accidentally having received two of them and we had a conversation about why he should return one. If you have any issues with this I suggest you take it up with him. It is evident that he is the one that has provided you the zoomed in images, in which case you can be certain that your organisation and your research services are being co-opted as part of a personal vendetta, which I have been advised by SA police is very close to harassment.
The medals and commendations that I have earned during my 20 year career in Defence for my service in Timor and the Middle East are recorded on PMKeys for appropriate authorities to view as required. Therefore I have no need or desire to pretend to have earned ADF medals.

I will await confirmation that you have no further queries in relation to this.

ANZMI then made further inquiries and ascertained that the recipient was only awarded the original medal Timor Leste Solidarity. He was not issued two medals as suggested by Alison May. Also, he was not the person who provided the information about May to ANZMI.

Alison May has provided ANZMI with two versions of events as to why she wore an un-entitled medal on Anzac Day. Of significance is her first response -;

There could have been one ANZAC Day in 2014 or 2015 where I wore it with the intention of representing him, because I recall him being in the psych ward at the Repatriation hospital and visiting him after the morning service.

Second response -;

As I previously said, the Solidarity medal belonged to an ex-partner of mine –(Name deleted by ANZMI). You will find that he is standing next to me in the original versions of the photos. I recall on one ANZAC day him asking me to wear it, but did not recall whether I agreed to his request.

The first version claims her ex-partner is in the Repatriation Hospital, the second version, he is standing next to her.

The versions also differ in that the first email response she claims, -; “I can only guess that it was absent minded when grabbing my other medals and pins”

And, the second response -;
“I recall on one ANZAC day him asking me to wear it, but did not recall whether I agreed to his request”.

Our role at ANZMI is to present the facts to the public. We will leave it to our readers to make their own judgements about the credibility of Ms Alison May and her replica Timor Leste Solidarity Medal. .

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