Doyle

Date of Entry: 20/10/2016
Surname: Doyle
Christian Names: Harley Stewart
Country: Australia
State or Province: SA
City or Town: Adelaide
Service #: R58376
Service: RAN
Branch: Stores Victualling
Commencement of service: 25 Sep 1961
Completion of service: Unknown
Case Notes:

Harley Stewart Doyle JP, is the State Vice-President of the Vietnam Veterans of Australia, South Australia Branch. This is an important and well-respected organisation for ensuring support to Vietnam Veterans in times of need, lobbying Government, and other forms of advocacy.

Doyle should be commended for his years of faithful service to fellow Veterans.

Doyle, however, should be condemned, for perpetuating dishonesty over many years by wearing medals he has not been awarded.

 

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The above photograph appeared in a number of syndicated publications throughout Australia, commemorating Vietnam Veterans Day in 2014. Here, Doyle can be seen wearing the following medals:

1. Australian Active Service Medal (AASM) 1945-75 (2 clasps) – only entitled to one clasp for this medal.
2. General Service Medal (GSM) 1962 (1 clasp) – no entitlement.
3. Vietnam Logistic Support Medal (VLSM) – entitled.
4. Australian Service Medal (ASM) 1945-75 (1 clasp) – no entitlement.
5. Australian Defence Medal (ADM) – entitled.
6. Pingat Jasa Malaysia Medal (PJM) – no entitlement.

Doyle joined the Royal Australian Navy in 1961 from the Adelaide Police Barracks, where he was a Probationary Constable, swapping one uniform for another.

 

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Pre-1970 Navy personnel records are publicly available from the National Australian Archives (NAA). Those records, in the case of a sailor, took the form of a “Ratings Record Card”. This item followed them throughout their career, until 1970, when this information was transferred to an electronic record.

 

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On the rear of the card is recorded all postings of the member. This information was recorded meticulously by administrative staff to ensure that every day was accounted for in regard to where the sailor was at that time.

Doyle’s first sea posting was to HMAS Duchess.

On 24 February 1964, just two weeks after the Voyager disaster, the Australian Government accepted the British offer of a replacement ship.

Duchess arrived in Sydney on 19 April 1964 with a combined RN/RAN ship’s company and a week later sailed for Williamstown Naval Dockyard for a much needed refit. She was commissioned into the RAN as HMAS Duchess (I) at Williamstown on 8 May with Commander Ian Burnside, RAN, in command.

The RN component of the crew returned to the UK leaving the ship completely in RAN hands for the first time. Duchess remained at Williamstown undergoing refit until 20 November 1964 when she departed for her homeport of Sydney. She arrived two days later and immediately began work-up in preparation for her first deployment on 19 January 1965.

Doyle served on the Duchess from 08 May 64 to 03 Jan 65.

The Australian War Memorial (AWM) keeps copies of the Report of Proceedings (ROPs) for HMA Ships, from both World Wars, the Korean War, and up until the end of the Vietnam War. Those documents are available online on the AWM website for public perusal.

An inspection of the ROPs for Duchess over the period Doyle was posted there, shows that the ship was in Australia undergoing refits and sea-trials. Duchess did not leave Australia on operational deployment until 19 Jan 65, as the extract of DVA records below discloses. Doyle posted off the ship 12 days before this deployment.

 

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Doyle was next posted to HMAS Sydney from 04 Jan 65 to 04 Apr 65. During this period Sydney did not leave Australian waters.

Doyle returned to Sydney on 28 Mar 67, completing three trips to Vietnam, as shown on the Vietnam Service Certificate below. These were the only operational deployments undertaken by Sydney in that year, spending from June to December alongside in Australia, undergoing refit.

 

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From the information provided so far, it can be seen that the three deployments to Vietnam were the only warlike, or non-warlike, service by Doyle. This becomes very relevant when Doyle’s entitlement to the medals he is wearing is scrutinised.

AASM 1945-1975: In the photograph Doyle can be seen to have two clasps to this medal. As his only warlike operational service was onboard HMAS Sydney, the medal should only have one clasp, namely ‘VIETNAM’.

GSM 1962: The GSM is an Imperial (UK) Award, instituted in 1964 to replace the Naval General Service Medal 1915-62, and the General Service Medal 1918-62. As is with all General Service Medals, it is issued with clasps, which define the operational service for which the award was made.

The clasps most commonly awarded to Australians are ‘MALAY PENINSULA’, ‘BORNEO’ and ‘SOUTH VIETNAM’, the latter awarded exclusively to Australian troops.

There are a number of qualifying criteria for the award of this medal. Doyle did not see any relevant operational service in those areas between 1962 and 1966 and is therefore not entitled to that medal.

VLSM: In 1993, the Vietnam Logistic and Support Medal was established to recognise those who had served in Vietnam during the time of the Vietnam War, for relatively short periods of time in support of Australian operations and who had not received any recognition for that service.

Doyle is entitled to the award of this medal for his deployments to Vietnam on HMAS Sydney.

ASM 1945-75: Doyle is also wearing this medal, to which is attached one clasp.

The ASM 1945-75 was approved in 1995, and may be awarded for service in, or in connection with, prescribed non-warlike operations during the period commencing on 3 September 1945 and ending on 16 September 1975.

For the time of Doyle’s service, the appropriate clasp would be ‘FESR’ for service with the Far East Strategic Reserve, between 02 July 1955 and 31 October 1971. However, Doyle did not see service in this area of operation. Doyle is not entitled to the medal or the clasp.

ADM: The ADM recognises ADF personnel who have efficiently completed either an initial enlistment period, or four years’ service, which ever is the lesser, and all of the relevant service was after 3 September 1945. Doyle is entitled to this medal.

PJM: In 2004, the Malaysian Government offered Australia the PJM medal to commemorate ADF personnel who served to uphold the sovereignty of Malaysia during the Malayan Emergency and the Indonesian Confrontation, between 31 August 1957 and 31 December 1966. The Australian government accepted the offer and has issued over 8,000 medals.

Once again, Doyle did not undertake qualifying service and is therefore not entitled to wear that medal.

Harley Stewart Doyle, you were appropriately awarded for your service in defence of our country, but chose to add a further three medals to your rack.

Harley Doyle was contacted by ANZMI. He was requested to provided an explanation as to his wearing of non awarded medals. He replied that in respect to the General Service Medal, he was on the HMAS Duchess when it sailed close to the qualifying area for the medal, so he thought that he would buy the medal and place it on his rack.

In respect to his purchasing and wearing the non-entitled second clasp on the Australian Active Service Medal, the non-entitled Australian Service Medal with one clasp and the non-entitled Pingjat Jasa Medal, he stated that it was "just something that he did at the time."

Harley Doyle, your actions have sullied all of your work with the VVAA and call into question your fitness to hold an executive position within that organisation and also fitness to remain as a Justice of the Peace. You are a Medals cheat and you should stand down immediately as the Vice President, South Australia State Branch of the Vietnam Veterans Association of Australia.  You have no credibility.

You are now among good company on the ANZMI website.

Case Management Notes:
 
Located in: Medal Cheats
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