Storer

Date of Entry: 26/05/2019
Surname: Storer
Christian Names: Bernard James
Country: Australia
State or Province: Victoria
City or Town: Unknown
Service: Army
Branch: Provost
Commencement of service: 1966
Completion of service: 1968
Case Notes:

 

BERNARD JAMES STORER UPDATE APRIL, 2019.

On each occasion, we view a photograph of Bernard Storer, former Australian Army Military Police Corporal, 1966 – 1968, he is wearing an additional medal.

In this photograph, he also poses before a United States Army Poster, portraying the image that he is either a former U.S. Army Serviceman or an Australian who served in the U.S. Army. We are not sure why he thinks that is necessary.

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Storer continues to wear the Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Palm that he purchased on ebay or a Medal Dealer and presented it to himself. He also now wears the Victoria Police Service medal for ethical and diligent behaviour. This is the last medal on his current rack. The medal and riband are shown below.


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This is a State issued internal Victoria Police Medal. Commonwealth Governor General’s protocols dictate that State medals should be worn on the right hand side and not added to or mixed with Federal issued medals worn on the left. Storer would be well aware of these protocols, but has added the State medal to embellish his rack.

Storer now rightly wears the National Medal for 15 years service in the Victoria Police Force. He is also entitled to one clasp for a further 10 years service. However, he has taken the liberty of awarding himself an extra second clasp, which indicates at least a 35 year career in that office.

Its an Honour, Canberra, indicates that Storer was issued the National Medal in May, 1987 and one clasp in September, 1990, the year he left the Police Force.

Further updates on Storer will be published periodically on ANZMI, as his medal rack continues to grow.

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3785919 Bernard James Storer was conscripted into the Australian Army in 1966.  Following completion of his Recruit Training, he was posted to Southern Command, Royal Australian Army Provost Corps, Melbourne.  He then completed his Corps Training and was promoted to the rank of Corporal.

On the 21 June, 1967, Storer was posted to 1 Divisional Provost Company, Vietnam.  For the following 9 months he served at Vung Tau, Nui Dat and Saigon as a Military Police Non Commissioned Officer.

His duties consisted of normal Military Police duties in those three locations and his service would not be regarded as out of the ordinary or exceptional.
Storer returned to Australia in March 1968 and returned to his former employment.

In the above photograph taken recently, Storer is wearing the following medals -:

1.      Australian Active Service Medal 1945-75  clasp Vietnam              Entitled

2.      Australian Vietnam Medal                                                          Entitled

3.      Australian Defence Medal                                                          Entitled

4.      National Service Medal                                                              Entitled

5.      Gallantry Cross with Palm (Republic of Vietnam Medal)                Not Entitled

6.      Vietnam Campaign Medal                                                          Entitled.

There seems to be a growing propensity of former Vietnam Veterans to wear this Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Palm.  If it has not been awarded officially by the former Republic of Vietnam Government and it is not recorded on your service records, you are not entitled to wear it.  It is as simple as that. 

The Medal can be purchased on the Internet for about $20.00 and this is what Storer and all the other medal cheats have done to improve their rack.


If you wear medals that you are not entitled to wear, then you can expect to be photographed and placed on the ANZMI site.  Our operatives are dispersed throughout Australia and New Zealand and the veteran community are sickened by the amount of genuine veterans adding non earned medals to their genuine rack for no other reason than to inflate their own ego and glorify their service.

This is published in the public interest, particularly that of the Vietnam Veteran Community. All information presented here is fact and the truth. Reports from the private citizens are supported by statement of fact and statutory declarations.

Located in: Stolen Valour
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