Latest Cases

Latest Cases

Surname: Russo
Christian Names: Ross James
Country: Australia
State or Province: Queensland
City or Town: Clifton Beach
Service #: 8088419
Service: Australian Army
Branch: Infantry
Commencement of service: Jul 07
Completion of service: Feb 09
Case Notes:

ACTUAL SERVICE.

Service No. 8088419.

Service: Trainee Rifleman Australian Army Reserves.

Branch. Infantry.

Commencement of Service. July, 2007.

Completion of Service. February, 2009.

Ross James Russo, born 30 November, 1967, of Clifton Beach, North Queensland, is a Medal Cheat, and a Valour Thief. His claims include suffering from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), due to his Special Operational Service in Iraq as an Engineer in the Australian Army and the Royal Australian Navy. (RAN). He blames the PTSD disability for his irrational behaviour. However, his name does not appear on the Department of Veterans Affairs Iraq Nominal Roll.

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The above photograph depicts Russo in a Queensland Corrective Services uniform. This photograph appeared in the Queensland Government Newsletter and was titled “Corrections News.” July, 2009 Issue. He graduated as a Recruit Corrective Services Officer on 8 May, 2009.

In the photograph he is wearing on his uniform,

 

Russo1A


1. The Australian Active Service Medal Ribbon. NOT ENTITLED.

The Australian Active Service Medal/ribbon is an Australian Military Decoration. It was authorised 13 September 1988 to recognise prescribed service in warlike operations. It is awarded with a clasp to denote the prescribed operation and subsequent awards of the medal are made in the form of additional clasps. Wikepedia.

2. Australian Service Medal Ribbon. NOT ENTITLED.

The Australian Service Medal/ribbon was approved in 1988, and may be awarded for service in, or in connection with a prescribed non-warlike operation.

3. Defence Force Long Service Medal Ribbon. NOT ENTITLED.

The Defence Force Long Service Medal/ribbon may be awarded to a member who has, on or after 14 February 1975, completed 15 years qualifying remunerated service in the Australian Defence Force. This includes efficient service in Permanent and Reserve Forces. Clasps are awarded for each further periods of five years efficient service.

Strangely, if the medal/ribbons were officially awarded, he would also be wearing the Iraq Campaign Medal/ribbon. Maybe it got lost in the post!

Unfortunately for Mr Russo, his Australian Defence Force Service, as depicted by the ribbons worn on his Corrective Services shirt is a lie. He has not been awarded any of the medals/ribbons he wears. He has purchased them and placed them on his Queensland Corrective Services uniform to big note himself.

Russo was a member of the part time Australian Army Reserves for a short time. He enlisted as a Recruit in July, 2007. He completed basic training, was engaged as a Trainee Rifleman, and resigned in February, 2009, a period of 20 months.

That was about the end of his illustrious military career. He was never a member of the permanent Australian Regular Army, let alone serve as a Special Forces member as an Engineer in the Australian Army. His short 20 months enlistment period would not permit the issue of the Australian Defence Medal to him for his service, unless he was medically discharged.   However, we believe that he resigned.   He was a Trainee Rifleman when he resigned.

 

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The above photograph is Russo carrying out his Australian Army Reserve Training.

Russo claims to others that he was a Military Police Officer in the Australian Army for 8 years. That statement is a lie.
He also claims that he was a member of 3 Battalion - Royal Australian Regiment.. That statement is also a lie.
His Linkedin page, now deleted, stated that he had 25 years experience “Special Operations” in Defence and the Queensland Police.

You guessed it! That is also a lie.

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Further inquiries of Russo regarding his wearing of unearned and un-awarded medal/ribbons, resulted in him stating that he was also in the Royal Australian Navy (RAN), and served in Iraq in a Naval “Marine Technical” role.. He stated that he served in the RAN from 1988 to 1994.(6 years) He quoted his Navy Service number as S143973. By his own admission (6 years service), he is not entitled to the Defence Force Long Service medal/ribbon for 15 years military service.

ANZMI are in possession of signed statements of fact, that state Russo has made the following claims about his military service in the Australian Defence Force, and the Queensland Police Force. These claims were made by Russo at meetings, and in conversations to others at the Mareeba Hospital Queensland, where he has been employed as an Operations Services Supervisor for about six years.

Witness 1. Russo stated,

1. That he was in the Australian Army for 3 years and had served in Afghanistan.
2. That he was in the Queensland Police Force for 17 years.

Witness 2. Russo stated,

3. That he was in the Army and served in Afghanistan and then he joined the Police Force.
4. That he injured his knees while parachuting out of planes in Afghanistan

Witness 3. Russo stated,

5. That he served in the Australian Regular Army as an MP (Military Police Officer) for 8 years, and also served in 3 RAR (Royal Australian Regiment), Infantry, for 3 years.

Russo was contacted and was given an opportunity to respond to the allegations of false military service claims. His response is below. He stated that this is his service record.

1988 – 1994 – Royal Australian Navy S143973 – Marine Technical
1994 - 2000 – Queensland Corrective Services – Custodial Correctional Officer
2000 – 2009 – Queensland Police Service – Operational Officer
2009 – Current – Queensland Health"


Russo appears to have his dates confused. The Corrective Services photograph of him taken at his graduation in May, 2009, is inconsistent with his claims of being a Queensland Police Officer from 2000 to 2009, when he then joined Queensland Health. Also it is odd, that he does not mention Australian Regular Army or Reserve Force Service, that would cover his alleged time in Afghanistan.

He also appears confused with his above LinkedIn entry where he claims Special Operations with Australian Defence Force and Queensland Police Service.

Queensland Police Service

1984 - 2009 – (25 years.)

Russo has also stated to others that he served in the Royal Australian Navy in Iraq in a Special Forces role. That is also not true.

He was requested to provide a copy of his Discharge Certificate or Certificate of Service that would prove that he was a returned Iraq or Afghanistan serviceman. He declined and then abused ANZMI in a series of objectionable emails.

Russo is a person who just tells lies when it suits him. He has no credibility. He was never a full time member of the Australian Regular Army. He did not serve in Iraq, or Afghanistan, on operational service in either capacity as an Engineer or anything else. His 20 months part time Reserve Force service as a Trainee Rifleman, was carried out in Australia. He was never qualified to the rank of Private Rifleman.

His current employers at Queensland Health should check Russo's resume and verify a few of his claimed prior qualifications, also his Defence and Police Service claims for his current role. They may get a surprise!

Russo has insulted genuine returned veterans from the Iraq War and Afghanistan War, by stealing their valour. He has also treated his former Corrective Services colleagues with contempt by wearing un-awarded medal/ribbons in their graduation class photograph in May, 2009, when he had no legal right to wear them.

Russo needs to make a public apology to not only his former Corrective Service colleagues, but also the veteran community in general.

Since Russo became aware that ANZMI was inquiring into his alleged military background, he has been a regular contributor of vitriolic comments about ANZMI , and its alleged members to a Face Book page, that defends shameless military valour thieves and medal cheats like Russo, and who are also named on this site.

Russo has also committed offences under the Australian Defence Act 1903 Sections 80A and 80B in respect to falsely representing himself to be a returned soldier, sailor or airman and wearing military service decorations that he is not entitled to wear.

DEFENCE ACT 1903 (EXTRACTS) The following extracts from the Defence Act 1903 apply to honours and awards:

80A Falsely representing to be returned soldier, sailor or airman

(1) A person is guilty of an offence if:
(a) the person represents himself or herself to be a returned soldier, sailor or airman; and
(b) the representation is false.

Penalty: 30 penalty units or imprisonment for 6 months, or both.

(2) For the purposes of this section:
(a) returned soldier means a person who has served abroad during any war as a member of any Military Force raised in Australia or in any other part of the British Empire, or as a member of the Military Forces of any Ally of Great Britain;
(b) returned sailor means a person who has served abroad during any war as a member of any Naval Force raised in Australia or in any other part of the British Empire, or as a member of the Naval Forces of any Ally of Great Britain; and
(c) returned airman means a person who has served abroad during any war as a member of any Air Force, air service or flying corps raised in Australia or in any other part of the British Empire or as a member of the air forces of any Ally of Great Britain.

80B Improper use of service decorations

(1) A person is guilty of an offence if:

(a) the person wears a service decoration; and
(b) the person is not the person on whom the decoration was conferred.

Penalty: 30 penalty units or imprisonment for 6 months, or both.

Russo is walking a fine line. It may well be that he could end up in the same Queensland prison as before, but in a different role from his Corrective Services held position in 2009.

We will be reporting Mr Russo to the appropriate authorities.

Surname: Urban
Christian Names: Barry
Country: Australia
State or Province: Western Australia
City or Town: Darling Range
Service #: Unknown
Service: British Army
Branch: Artillery
Commencement of service: 1985
Completion of service: 1989
Case Notes:

PREFACE:

ANZMI are an impartial group of former Australian and New Zealand Military Veterans. ANZMI is not aligned with any political party in Australia or New Zealand. Our role in the Australian and New Zealand Veteran Communities is to protect the honour of all those men and women, who are currently serving in those Defence Forces, or who have served and or died on War Like, Non War Like, Peacekeeping, or Peacetime deployments.

Our objective is to target and expose those, who claim that they have done the hard yards, and/or boast of non- existent operational service, or wear Australian and New Zealand medals and other accoutrements that have not been awarded to them.

This site lists a multitude of Imposters, including Valour Thieves, Medal Cheats and Wannabees, who, for their own personal glory and benefit, have illegally boasted of operational service, that they have not performed, or worn medals illegally. Both these types of deceitful imposters commit offences against the Australian Defence Act 1903, Sections 80A and 80B.

In New Zealand, the illegal actions of military imposters are covered under of the Military Decorations and Distinctive Badges Act 1918 Section 4A.

Those who wear unearned medals, purchase them from Medal Dealer’s shops, or online.

Their behaviour is unacceptable to all genuine veterans.
- -
The below photograph depicts Mr Barry Urban. MLA. Barry Urban was born on the 10 December, 1968 in Ashlington. Northumberland, England. He is the current sitting member for the State electorate for Darling Range, Western Australia, near Perth.. He is now an Independent, following his resignation from the Australian Labor Party, following serious questions regarding his integrity and credibility.

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In the above photographs, Urban is wearing -;
1. The Australian Police Overseas Service Medal. (POSM) No clasp.
2. The United Nations Force in Cyprus Medal.(UNFICYP)


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The Police Overseas Service Medal is an award in the Australian honours system. The award is presented to those members of an Australian Police force who undertake service;
• with international peace-keeping organisations, or
• Following a request from another government for assistance.
The award was introduced by letters patent on 25 April 1991.
It comes with a clasp denoting the area of assigned UN deployment.

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The above medal is the United Nations Force in Cyprus Medal. (UNFICYP)
It is awarded: for 3 months' service with the Mission, keeping peace between Greek and Turkish Cypriots. Civilian Police or members of any Nation’s Defence Forces, who serve in Cyprus for the qualifying period, are eligible to apply for this medal.

Barry Urban’s life is described below in a Biography that appeared on Face book.

On leaving school, he joined the British Army about 1984, discharged, and then joined the Hertfordshire Constabulary, England.
Biography Face book Barry Urban.
Biography
About Barry Urban

Barry was born in a mining village in the North East of England called Ashington in Northumberland. His mother was a nursing assistant and father was a coal miner until the colliery closed and he made a living selling rose bushes; a casualty of the miners' dispute in the mid 1980s.

His childhood was like that of most children from the area: hard and eventful. After leaving school at the age of 16, Barry joined the British Army. He has obtained a number of qualifications, and spent a large portion of his career on exercises and military operations in Northern Ireland, Cyprus and Namibia, attaining military medals and a citation.

In late 1989 Barry joined the UK police in Hertfordshire after a brief tour in the Ascension Islands. Throughout his police career he spent a number of years on front line duties, Police Tactical firearms and finally as a detective on the Regional Crime Squad.

During his career in the police force Barry obtained a Bachelor Degree and a Post Graduate Degree in police studies.
After returning from duties in Bosnia carrying out war crime investigations, he retired from the UK Police Force and was awarded a police medal and another citation.

After a period of almost 12 months travelling the world Barry found himself in Rockingham, Western Australia, and decided to apply for immigration and was granted a visa and later citizenship.

His first five years in Australia were spent working in the construction industry as a production manager, projects manager then area manager in the Pilbara and Kimberley.

Barry returned to the police force in 2005 and was involved in a number of major initiatives in the South East Metro District and front line policing.

In 2011 he decided to run for Local Government and was elected into the Serpentine Jarrahdale Council. His involvement has been great and vast with involvement in the State Graffiti task force, the State Trails Reference Group, Peel Tourism, National Trust and a number of other community groups.

Barry's time serving on the council verified the lack of support for the South East corridor and the Darling Range area. The frustration over this issue was felt both at home and within the community groups he is involved with, which prompted Barry to run for the seat of Darling Range in the State election and finally give the families living in the area the support they need.
categories
Politician


The above profile has since been removed from his Face book page.

Below is a copy of his LinkedIn profile and also through his maiden speech to the WA Parliament in 2017. -;


Lance Bombadier
Wingate Troop
3RHA J(Sidi Rezegh) Battery
June 1985 - December 1989
Served in Paderborn, Germany
Cyprus
Northern Ireland


Initially, Barry Urban’s life started to unravel following his election to the Western Australian Parliament in March, 2017, as the member for Darling Range. His photograph appeared in a number of published media articles wearing the Australian POSM and the UNFICYP medals.

Obviously, something did not seem right with some former colleagues, who knew that Urban had not served overseas, as a Western Australia Police Officer to Cyprus, in an Australian United Nations contingent, during his 6 years service. It was also obvious that he was not entitled to wear the Australian Police Overseas Service Medal. (POSM), that he had been observed wearing for many years. It could not have been awarded to him as he was not entitled.

On the 18 November, 2017, the following front page article appeared in the “West Australian” News Paper.

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Following the publishing of this article, ANZMI were inundated with emails from concerned former Police, and Military personnel, and also members of the public.

Concerns were expressed regarding Urban’s non credible and conflicting excuses, regarding how he came into possession of the POSM.

He initially claimed that the POSM was a legitimate International Police Award for his British Police service in Bosnia.

That is a lie. It is an Australian award.

He further claimed that the British and Australian Overseas Police Service Medals were exactly the same. That is also a lie.

He stated that he must have been sent the wrong one by the British Police 17 years ago. That is also a lie The British Police/Government does not issue Australian Federal Awards.

In the article, he is quoted as stating, “I will be honest with you, the medal I have is totally different to the one I should have. This was sent to me in 2000, and I have been wearing it ever since. I have written to the UK Police to find out what has gone on”. That statement is also a lie.

The medal that Urban is referring to is the “Commemorative International Police Medal” You can purchase it on line for about UK20 pounds sterling.. ANZMI refer to them as “Tin medals” They are trinkets. If you have to buy a medal, you did not earn it. Simple as that.

Below is the ribbon for the International Police Medal. It is not exactly the same as the POSM as claimed by Urban. In fact, it is nothing like it.

 

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Strangely, a former Australian Special Air Service Regiment (SASR) Major, and now Western Australia Labor Party politician and Housing Minister, Mr Peter Tinley, has been quoted below -;

Housing Minister Peter Tinley — a former Special Air Service Regiment commander — defended Mr. Urban yesterday.
“Let’s be really clear about this, his service is not in question — his administration is,” Mr. Tinley said. “He served in Cyprus, he’s served in Bosnia and he’s given great service. He’s just unfortunately got his administration wrong and applied for or obtained the wrong medal.”

By his own admission, Urban has been wearing this medal fraudulently for 17 years. That is not "wrong administration", Mr Tinley; it is deceitful behaviour over a very long period, by someone who should know a lot better.. It is contemptible to genuine Police and Military personnel who have served in Operational theatres of conflict. You should agree with that.

Urban has subsequently admitted that he purchased the POSM from a Medal dealer in Western Australia.

Since Urban was detected deceitfully wearing the Federal Award, he has taken time off his parliamentary duties on stress leave. He has since stated that he is suffering from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.

He stated in the W.A Parliament on the 30 November, 2017, about his fraudulent wearing of the POSM -; (Source ABC News)

On the admission he had falsely represented a medal as an official award from British authorities, when he had actually purchased it online,
Mr Urban insisted he was under the "genuine but mistaken" belief that it was the correct medal.
"I am embarrassed by my error and for the hurt I may have caused by my actions," he said.


If you believe that statement, you might also believe in Santa !!!

Urban continues the façade. His claims are totally inconsistent with reality, and are not believable. Just ask his alleged Medal dealer!

He claims British Army military service in Cyprus with the United Nations, as a Lance Bombadier, Artillery. - You do not get awarded an Australian Police Overseas Service Medal for that.

He would know that!

He also claims British Police overseas service in Bosnia-Herzgovina investigating war crimes. – You do not get awarded an Australian Police Overseas Service Medal for that either.

He would know that as well!

Investigations are continuing by an appointed W.A. Parliamentary Committee, regarding his claims of University degrees, allegedly awarded to him in the United Kingdom, and other matters.

He has already admitted to the W.A Parliament that he was not awarded a Diploma that he had previously claimed. Two Universities in the U.K., where Urban claims to have been awarded degrees, have never heard of him.

Also his alleged military service in Cyprus and entitlement to the UNFICYP, and police service in Bosnia-Herzegovina needs to be thoroughly investigated..

He could save a lot of people a lot of trouble, by just proving his claims, and telling the truth about his Army and Police overseas service. If his memory is as bad as what it seems, he could simply order of a copy of his records from the U.K. and produce them.

In fairness, we sent Urban an email inviting him to provide details of his claimed Cyprus service, and evidence that he was entitled to wear the POSM and the UNFICYP. He has not responded.

In the meantime, Urban continues on as the State Member for Darling Range, Western Australia. He has since resigned from the Australian Labor Party, and is now an Independent for that electorate.

He is a false pretender and he should resign.

An update will be provided in the near future regarding Mr. Barry Urban. MLA.

Surname: Fudge
Christian Names: Malcolm Robert
Country: Australia
State or Province: Victoria
City or Town: Melbourne
Service #: R64448
Service: Royal Australian Navy
Branch: Gunnery
Commencement of service: 05 Jun 1965
Completion of service: 20 Jul 68
Case Notes:

 

Malcolm Robert Fudge joined the Royal Australian Navy on 5 June 1965, at a time when Australia was conducting a number of warlike operations in South-East Asia and Vietnam.

Within 12 months of joining, Fudge would see operational service in SE Asia whilst serving on HMAS Parramatta. The following year saw Fudge posted to HMAS Sydney whilst she was engaged on logistics operations to Vietnam, with Fudge recording 101 days operational service.

For his service, Fudge is entitled to wear:

  1. Australian Active Service Medal 1945-75 (with clasp VIETNAM)
  2. Vietnam Logistic Support Medal
  3. Australian Service Medal 1945-75 (with clasp FESR)

 

Fudge 1

 

Fudge 2

 

The above photographs appeared in the online edition of the Melbourne Age as part of their coverage of the 2016 ANZAC Day Dawn Service in Melbourne.

There is always interest in a veteran that is emblazoned with medals, which is obvious in the second photograph where it concentrates on the medals rather than the wearer’s head.

The caption below the photographs reads:

Malcolm Fudge comes every year for the dawn service and to march. He served in Borneo and Vietnam in 1966, 1967 and 1968.

On Anzac Day he likes to reflect on the service of his grandfather (Boer War) and his stepfather and two uncles (World War II). "I like to
think about them and their service rather than my own. Some parts of my service were fantastic, other parts I don't like to dwell on."

One the left side of his blazer he wears his medals, on the right his family's medals.

Fudge appears to be doing the right thing in that he has displayed family medals

On the right side of the chest, and his own on the left, as dictated by protocol.

To the untrained eye, Fudge has an impressive number of medals. However, the red arrow points towards three medals that at best, can be described as ‘tin junk’, namely:

  1. Vietnam Logistic Support Commemorative
  2. Far East Strategic Reserve (FESR) Commemorative
  3. HMAS Sydney Commemorative

These medals have no official standing, or credibility, within the Australian Honours and Awards system. They are commemorative medals sourced by various associations and should never be worn in public at service commemorations.

To add insult to the recognised operational service of other veterans, Fudge has seen fit to adorn these pieces of tin with a number of campaign clasps, making him seem even more of a battle-hardened veteran.

To the reasonable man, it could be argued that Fudge may have mistakenly put the tin medals on his coat that day. However, medal protocol is widely known and advertised within the defence and ex-service environment, yet many still do what they wish and even more seemingly turn a blind eye to the behaviour of their fellow veterans.

The behaviour of Fudge has likely gone unchecked for a number of years, as the photographs below, taken at the 2009 Kinglake ANZAC Dawn service, attest to.

Fudge 3

 

Fudge 4

To quote Fudge, “Some parts of my service were fantastic, other parts I don’t like to dwell on”. Perhaps, Fudge should dwell on the dishonesty he has perpetuated and the insult to the service of other veterans, in particular, his own relatives, who’s medals he proudly displays along with his own. Welcome to ANZMI, where others can dwell on what you have done.

Surname: Rysdale
Christian Names: Alex
Country: Australia
State or Province: New South Wales
City or Town: Tahmoor
Service #: None
Service: None
Branch: None
Commencement of service: N/A
Completion of service: N/A
Case Notes:

 

It seems that a lot of military imposters exposed on the ANZMI website are pursuing their one moment of glory in their lifetime. Something to impress their immediate family, fiancées, close friends and the wider community in general.

Alex Rysdale, born about 1951 of Tahmoor (near Picton) NSW, is typical of this type of imposter.

Rysdale is a disgrace and an embarrassment to the veteran community. He should hang his head in shame. He is a low life individual who has stolen the valour of all those brave men, who fought and died in the Vietnam War. He insinuates that he was a member of Special Forces, "in a Squad of six."

He is an outright liar without honour or integrity.

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Rysdale gave an in-depth interview to an unsuspecting Journalist from the Wollondilly Advertiser, about his heroic deeds as a Special Forces operative in the Australian Army, whilst he was fighting in the jungles of South Vietnam in 1969.

The below story was published on the 6 November, 2017 in that newspaper and also in the Campbelltown Macarthur Advertiser, shortly after.

Everything stated by Rysdale that appears in bold italics in this article is a lie. He has never served.


WOLLONDILLY
ADVERTISER


NOVEMBER 6 2017 - 11:06AM
Vietnam veteran faces horrors of war
• Ashleigh Tullis

 

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Tahmoor's Alex Rysdale is a member of the Picton Anzac Day Committee but wants nothing to do with the government or RSLs because of the way veterans were treated after the Vietnam War. Picture: Chris Lane

I did become an animal.”
Tahmoor’s Alex Rysdale continues to live with the nightmares and horrors of fighting in the Vietnam War.
At 18 years old he enlisted in the Australian armed forces and was sent to Vietnam in 1969.
“I was a soldier,” he said. “I fought my way through the war both physically and mentally.”
Mr Rysdale still struggles with what war made him do.
“You change,” he said. “You become an animal. You do things that are worse than anything an animal can do.
“The hardest part is when I came back into the world and nobody cared.
“We didn’t have the camaraderie in the outside world.
“The hard part is remembering. I don’t want to remember and I keep away from the triggers.”

Mr Rysdale went into the army after completing his apprenticeship as a typewriter mechanic.
In 1969 he started his basic training and was named the cadet of the year. He trained in Western Australia and Queensland before being sent to Vietnam.

“Our squad went on patrols, looked for tunnel networks and cleared them out,” the veteran said.
“We were called to hunt down a sniper and take him out.
“We were to spot the enemy’s troop movements. Our squad of six would come up against 200 North Vietnamese Army troops and we would have to fight our way out.”

Mr Rysdale recalls one particular time when he thought he would die.
“We were asleep in a shallow grave and were covered in leaves to hide ourselves,” he said.
“There was a trail 10 metres to the left. I could hear them because the ground was vibrating.
“Three hundred North Vietnamese Army troops walked past us.
“Somehow we weren’t spotted.”

 

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Alex Rysdale still lives with the scars from his service. Picture: Chris Lane

Mr Rysdale was evacuated from Vietnam in 1970.
I was shot and blown up at the same time,” he said.
“I was hiding behind a tree when we were out on patrol looking for troop movements.
“Three in our squad were killed.”

Mr Rysdale was taken to Germany then to Sydney to the Concord Repatriation Hospital.
“After I got out of hospital I was walking through the city and there was a construction site,” he said.
“A worker was using a jackhammer and I hit the ground and started screaming like a lunatic.
“Someone kicked me and told me to go to a shelter because he thought I was drunk.
“People will never understand what we went through.”

Mr Rysdale suffers from post traumatic stress disorder and said he can “just snap” at times.
“I wake up screaming at night.” he said. “Doctors can put a name on it but I think the nightmares are my own shame about what I did over there.”
Mr Rysdale said he has never really talked about his time during the Vietnam War.
The way he was treated after the war was why he never wanted anything to do with Returned Service Leagues or the government.
“I remember how badly we were treated by people back home,” he said.
“One time I was on rest and recuperation and I was so excited to have a home cooked meal by mum and get hugs and kisses from my family.
“As soon as I got off the plane I had eggs and tomatoes thrown at me and I was called a baby killer.
“I turned straight around and flew back to Bangkok.
“To this day I have never heard one of the idiots put their hand up and say they were really sorry.
“Our government didn’t recognise Vietnam as a war and that meant the guys were not given the rights and recognition they deserved for a long time.”


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A wreath laid at the centenary ceremony during Remembrance Day at Picton Memorial Park. Picture: Ashleigh Tullis

Mr Rysdale is the last member of his squad and was very close with his fellow soldiers.
“I loved those blokes,” he said.
“We didn’t see each other often but I still thought about them.
“During the war we had so much fun as a whole group because we were a tight knit unit of six guys.
“So when only three of us came back with scars from being mentally wounded and abused, it didn’t seem right to have fun because it wasn’t with everybody in the group.
“If we would catch up at a funeral then we would buy six beers. One beer each for guys who didn’t come back and one for us.
“I think that was a fitting way to remember them.”

Mr Rysdale said he did not go to Remembrance Day or Anzac Day ceremonies until last year when he was asked to lay a wreath.
He is a member of the Picton Anzac Day Committee and helps man fundraising stalls, sets up for the ceremonies and is a part of the committee’s discussions but otherwise does not want to attend the ceremonies.

Mr Rysdale does however have a lot of admiration for the committee and what they have created in the Picton Memorial Park.
“Personally I think (name deleted) should be knighted for his hard work, dedication and the time he has put into helping veterans and the committee,” he said. (End of Article)
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Rysdale is a grandstander. We wonder what he has told his immediate family and brand new fiancée. We know that he told the Committee of the Picton Anzac Day Committee (PADC) that he was a Vietnam Veteran. With that background, he was accepted immediately as a committee member. When asked why he never wore his Vietnam medals on Anzac Days, he replied to the Committee “that the originals were mounted in a frame on his wall at home and that he did not have a set of replica medals".

Rysdale’s name does not appear on the Department of Veteran’s Affairs - Vietnam Nominal Roll - It is accurate. His name also does not appear on the Australian Special Air Service Regiment (SASR) Association record of former members. His name also does not appear on any other documentation held at the National Archives of Australia for military service in any branch of the Australian Defence Force.

Rysdale is a pathetic individual who has placed himself out there in the public domain as a War Hero. He is nothing of the sort and should be shunned by the people in his home town of Tahmoor, New South Wales.

We sent Rysdale a request, giving him an opportunity to explain his extraordinary claims of heroic Vietnam War Army service, his enlistment and discharge dates, Army service number and his Unit.

He replied stating that - "I have spoken with the reporter at the advertiser and onformed (sic) her of my opinion on this. You dont know me and never will. You think that in this particular instance you are doing the right thing. I agree with what you do is great but not this time. I am not happy to continue this as per your demands and and have resigned from the Anzac committee. All this has done is cause me the utmost pain. Please talk with Ashley and she will be happy to discuss this with you".
Regards
Alex Rysdale


Any pain being suffered by Rysdale, is due the the fact that he knows that he has been well and truly caught out as a military imposter and valour thief..

Rysdale has committed an offence under the provisions of the Defence Act 1903 Part V11, Section 80A - Falsely representing himself to be a returned soldier.

DEFENCE ACT 1903 (EXTRACTS) The following extracts from the Defence Act 1903 apply to honours and awards:

80A Falsely representing to be returned soldier, sailor or airman

(1) A person is guilty of an offence if:
(a) the person represents himself or herself to be a returned soldier, sailor or airman; and
(b) the representation is false.

Penalty: 30 penalty units or imprisonment for 6 months, or both.

ANZMI have notified the local authorities.

The last we heard, the Wollondilly Advertiser is publishing an update of the original story shortly.

The update should read a little differently and will be factual.

 

 

Surname: Mallaghan
Christian Names: Thomas Gerard
Country: Australia
State or Province: Victoria
City or Town: Phillip Island
Service #: R96066
Service: Royal Australian Navy
Branch: Junior Recruit
Commencement of service: 02 Apr 1967
Completion of service: Unknown
Case Notes:

Mallaghan 1

Browse through the pages of ANZMI and you may recognise a theme – Returned and Services League (RSL) Sub Branch Presidents who are exposed as medal cheats.

Why these people have to display such disrespect towards the members they are supposed to be representing is beyond belief. Do they feel inadequate because others may have more medals, or is it just to groom their own ego and inflate their self-importance?

If you are unfortunate enough to meet any of these miscreants, you might like to ask them “Why”?

Thomas Gerard Mallaghan is the President of the Phillip Island RSL Sub Branch, and has been since 2015.

The above photograph was taken on ANZAC Day 2015. Here, it can be seen, at the end of his Feddeeral medals, Mallaghan has added the Victorian State Emergency Service (SES) Long Service Medal.

Mallaghan 2

Mallaghan has been photographed wearing this medal since 2013 and as recently as 2017 at a community function at Phillip Island.

He has been appropriately recognised for both his State and Federal service, as a member of the Royal Australian Navy and the State Emergency Service of Victoria.

The SES has a good media presence and there are no shortage of SES members marching on ANZAC Day, wearing their Federal medals on the left breast, and State medals on the right, as do their Country Fire Authority compatriots.

That Mallaghan, a man of his position and experience, was unaware of medal protocol, simply would not stand up to the scrutiny of a ‘reasonable person’.

The Victorian RSL State Executive appear to be not at all interested in administering medal protocol, evident by the number of their executives that grace this site!

Service in the Defence Force instills in one a set of values, among them, and across all three Services – Honesty, Honour and Integrity. These values are the cornerstones of the Forces that have given great service to this country since Federation.

Is there a culture among RSL Executive of dumping these values, along with personal pride and respect for the rules and regulations, once they leave that uniform behind? If so, it is certainly time for a new team to take over before the RSL fades into irrelevance and is just a place for old men, shiny trinkets and tall stories.

Surname: Wagner aka Ragno
Christian Names: Shane or Cosimo
Country: Australia
State or Province: Western Australia
City or Town: Eglington
Service #: None
Service: None
Branch: None
Commencement of service: Claims 1969 to 1976
Case Notes:

 

 

 

Wagner stood in the Australian War Memorial (AWM) Canberra and gazed at the Long Tan Cross that was on loan for exhibition. He also identified "himself" in a photograph taken in the Long Tan Rubber Plantation in August 1969 that was accompanying the exhibition. Here is Wagner gazing at the Cross at the AWM

 Wagner 1 2017 08 06 2

We hold Statutory Declarations stating that Wagner claims to have fought in the Battle of Long Tan with D Company, 6th Battalion Royal Australian Regiment (6RAR) on the 18th August 1966.

The Statutory Declarations state that Wagner claims; He was in the Battle of Long Tan in Vietnam and then served with the Special Air Service Regiment (SASR). He said he was the youngest soldier to serve in Vietnam and became a "Sniper" with a 140 odd "strikes" to his name and he liked to work alone.

 Shane Wagner was born Cosimo Ragno in Italy in October 1951 and came to Australia as an infant. At the tender age of fifteen in 1966 he certainly would have been the youngest person to serve in Vietnam.   All Vietnam nominal rolls and data from 6RAR have been checked and, Wagner aka Ragno did not serve in Vietnam with the Australian Defence Force at any time. To join the Army you had to be 17 years old and to be sent to Vietnam you had to be 19 years old. Wagner aka Ragno is a liar and a Wannabe.

We contacted two retired senior members of D Company, 6RAR and they advised that Wagner is not known by the 6RAR fraternity and did not serve with 6RAR in Vietnam or at any other time in any capacity.

An ANZMI investigator phoned Wagner to enquire about his service. Wagner said he was an ex Serviceman and he served in "Nam" with 6RAR during 1967 and 1968. Any Vietnam veteran who uses the Americanism "Nam" is immediately suspected of being a crook, then when you realise that 6RAR was not in Vietnam during 1967 - 1968 it is obvious we have found another one.

Wagner claims to have gazed at the Cross on another occasion in 1966 when it was "originally erected" in the Long Tan Rubber Plantation. Unfortunately for Wagner the cross was not erected until 1969, during 6RARs second tour of duty in Vietnam. A solemn commemorative ceremony at the newly erected Long Tan Cross was conducted in the Long Tan Rubber Plantation in Vietnam on 18th August 1969.  

Wagner 2 2017 08 06 3


This photograph below was taken on 18 August 1969 and was also part of the AWM exhibition, those in the photograph are genuine ANZACs. The photograph was taken on the 18 August 1969. Wagner identifies himself as the third person on the left side of the photograph

 

Wagner 3 2017 08 06 3 

It is not Wagner, and we are sure that because of the 9 millimetre pistol the person is wearing he is most likely from 1 Armoured Personnel Carrier Squadron, whose unit in 1966, after four hours of engagement by the 108 men of the beleaguered D Company 6RAR provided the necessary support and firepower to be able to repel the North Vietnamese and help rescue the 90 heroic survivors of D Company 6RAR.  

 Here is a synopsis of the final stages of the battle.

 AT 1900 hrs during the battle 3 Troop of 1 Armoured Personnel Carrier Squadron advanced through 'D' Company's position, carrying out a quick sweep of the area through which the attacking Vietnamese were forming up for another attack, catching the enemy on their flanks and inflicting heavy casualties.  Upon seeing the arrival of the Armoured Personnel Carriers the enemy broke off its attack, the survivors melting away back into the jungle and leaving the Australians in possession of the battlefield.  The Australians suffered 18 men killed and 24 wounded. Of these, one of the men that had been killed was from 3 Troop.

As well as being a lying wannabe he has lied in the Magistrates Court about his non existent military service and in doing so, has perverted the course of justice. Here is what his legal representative told the Magistrate at a hearing at Maroochydore Queensland in 2013.

 

Wagner 4 2017 08 06 3

Wagner is not, and never has been on any Department of Veterans Affairs (DVA) disability benefits. Here is more of the lying palaver he has uttered.

 

Wagner 5 2017 08 06 3

Wagner has mentioned a very honourable man (name expunged) as being his guide and mentor to get his "Entitlements" from DVA. Wagner does not know, and has never communicated with the person he has mentioned. In essence Wagner is not fit to wipe the mud off the man's boots.

There were 3,629 Australian and New Zealand casualties in the Vietnam War 521 of those died and thousands more have since suffered and died from the effects of the war. People like Wagner are a blight on the Veteran community.

Wagner falsely claims to have served in Vietnam at the famous ANZAC battle of Long Tan.

This entry will serve to advise those he has deceived that he is a liar, a cheat and a fraud.

Wagner richly deserves his years of infamy on this website.

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